Author: Miles Trinidad

ASUO wraps up fall term with new resolutions, campaigns and a radio show

Senators and ASUO Executives have both settled into their roles as the fall term concluded. Each had their own success and challenges. Here’s a look at a few of the major moments of the term. Senate Senate was put under pressure by the Young Americans for Liberty, a libertarian student group, on Nov. 11 when the Senate denied the group’s $950 request for a poker night where attendees had a chance to win firearms. The group returned on Nov. 18 claiming that the senate violated viewpoint neutrality and sought reimbursement for a donor who gave them the money for the event. Senate denied the request and the university decided not to act on the allegation of viewpoint discrimination. Senate Vice President Quinn Haaga said that members did a good job maintaining viewpoint neutrality given the nature of the request. Senate members are working on a resolution to possibly halt the expansion of new fraternity and sorority chapters after findings in a recent climate survey indicated that students involved in Greek life still face significantly higher rates of sexual assault than those who are not involved. Haaga says that the Senate will wait for the results of an external review before continuing action with the resolution. Senators repealed a resolution that prevented student groups from requesting funds for off-campus retreats on Nov. 4. Haaga says the senate reversed its initial...

Read More

Guaranteed tuition plan raises more concerns with Board of Trustees

On Oct. 28 the first open forum with the Tuition and Fees Advisory introduced the possible implementation of a guaranteed tuition plan. Now, Board of Trustees members question if the plan will better students or the university. In addition to concerns raised by ASUO executives earlier last week at a Dec. 3 meeting, the Board of Trustees also questioned the plan’s effectiveness and the financial risk that it creates. Vice President for Enrollment, Roger Thompson says the biggest advantages of implementing this program are that it provides a realistic four-year cost for families and students who are planning to enroll in the university, and that the buying power of scholarships will remain the same. “We are able to talk with families honestly and ethically about the total cost of earning a degree. The risk of financial hardship moves from the student to the university,” Thompson said. However, financial predictability creates new challenges that administrators, and possibly students, may have to face. Jamie Moffitt, Vice President for Finance and Administration, says the university has to be willing to take on the financial risk that comes with this plan. She says the impending increase of costs for the Oregon Public Employee Retirement System and unknown university costs in the future will undoubtedly increase tuition for incoming students. The university must take responsibility to minimize that increase as much as possible so...

Read More

Student group leads charge for racial equity

The Black Student Task Force at the University of Oregon is pushing administration to help black students succeed and make them feel safer on campus. After the release of the BTSF’s list of demands, the group joined student groups nationwide that have also issued lists of demands addressing similar struggles and goals regarding racial issues at their schools. Joseph Lowndes, an associate professor of political science who participated in the rally at UO, says that this high-energy national movement was inspired by the event at the University of Missouri, the Black Lives Matter movement and the recent insurgencies around...

Read More

Two acapella groups qualify for ICCA quarterfinals

After qualifying for the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella Northwest Quarterfinals on Nov. 15, University of Oregon acappella groups Divisi and Mind the Gap are aiming to win the top two spots and setting their sights to qualify for finals. Both Mind the Gap, a co-ed acappella group, and Divisi, an all-female acappella group, were selected out of over 40 other groups in the region to compete in the Northwest quarterfinals after submitting a video performance to Varsity Vocals, the organization that hosts the competitions. At quarterfinals, the two groups will compete against eight other groups to advance to semifinals. At the competitions, groups are judged on the vocal and visual performance during their three-song set. In order for groups to qualify for ICCA Finals, they must secure a place in the top two in quarterfinals to advance to semifinals, and then earn first place to qualify for finals. Neither group has ever advanced beyond semifinals, but both Macy Hyland, Business Manager of Mind the Gap, and Caitlin Byers, Divisi’s Musical Director, say that their groups are working to refine their skills and are determined to qualify and even win the finals. At last year’s quarterfinals, Mind the Gap earned first place and received awards for best soloist, best choreography and best arrangement. However, they did not place in semifinals. Hyland said the group is determined to qualify...

Read More

Equestrian Club riders show potential and set sights for nationals

The Equestrian Club’s Western and Hunt Seat teams respectively earned third and sixth place out of nine at its first competition at Linn-Benton Community College. Three riders are now in the hunt to qualify for nationals. Equestrian Club President Courtney Horan says this year’s team is one of the best teams she has seen since she joined the club her freshman year. At the level the team is currently performing, Horan says that the team, with a freshman-dominated club, will only get better in the future. Three-year member, Chiara Ciacci says the first competition for newcomers is difficult because they have to adjust to new rules and riding random horses — a process that is designed to create an equal playing field. Despite adjustments that newcomers make, all new members placed in their classes. Horan says that three individuals, Jessica Barker, Hannah Gray and Ciacci, are currently front runners to qualify for spots at the national competition in May in Lexington, Kentucky. Barker and Gray placed first and third in Western, and Ciacci placed third and sixth in open flat and open fences for Hunt Seat. All three riders are in class 15, the most advanced and skilled group of riders at competitions. “[Our club’s] abilities and understanding of horsemanship and riding are the best that we’ve ever had,” Horan said. In order for individuals to qualify for nationals,...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Advertisement

Emerald Podcasts

Latest Print Edition

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Archives

Outside the Lines

Eye Health Northwest has been servicing the Oregon eye community since 1954 and has a become a top choice for Oregonians searching for eye doctors Portland OR and lasik eye doctors near Eugene, OR.